Image for post
Image for post
Anjali Nair | MSNBC; Getty Images

America saw record voter turnout in 2020, and now the Republican Party is working overtime to ensure that never happens again. The GOP is cashing in on their decades long disinformation campaign of false claims of ballot harvesting and election fraud to justify the need for tighter voting restrictions.

According to the Brennan Center, Republican lawmakers in 45 states have proposed at least 253 new laws to make voting harder. The proposed bills take aim at mail-in voting, seek to remove automatic and election day-voter registration, limit early voting, and in some cases remove weekend voting. …


Image for post
Image for post
A vigil in protest against an execution in Virginia in 2009. Michael Reynolds: EPA

On February 21, Virginia lawmakers voted in favor of eliminating the death penalty. Governor Ralph Northam is expected to sign the bill into law. This move to end the death penalty by the Commonwealth of Virginia is historic, and once signed by the Governor, Virginia will be the first southern state to outlaw capital punishment.

Dating back to colonial Jamestown in 1608, Virginia has one of the oldest death penalties on record and has executed roughly 14,000 people, which is more than any other state with a history of using capital punishment. While Virginia has not imposed a death sentence…


Image for post
Image for post

With the 2020 election barely in the rearview, Florida is already looking ahead to the 2022 election, and Democrats are eyeing the Governor’s mansion.

Trump won Florida both in 2016 and 2020 and Republicans won the voter turnout game in 2020. This has Republicans declaring Florida Trump Country, but Democrats are saying not so fast.

When it comes to unseating Trump’s favorite Florida governor, Ron DeSantis, Florida Democrats have their work cutout for them. DeSantis rode into his Governorship with high hopes and showed a lot of promise with his ability and desire to work across the aisle. Then the…


Image for post
Image for post
Rhona Wise : AFP — Getty Images file

This weekend, as people celebrate Valentine’s Day with candy hearts, cards, and flowers, the Parkland community will mourn the third anniversary of the tragic Marjory Stoneman Douglas school shooting, which claimed the lives of 17 people and injured 17 more.

To prevent another Parkland from happening again, Florida Representative Dan Daley, who is a graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, filed HB-951, the Parents Need to Know Act. This Act would require schools to notify parents and staff within 24 hours when a threat or incident has taken place on campus and to include what actions were taken in…


Image for post
Image for post

One week after the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, the House of Representatives voted with bipartisan support 232–197 in favor of H.Res 24, impeaching President Donald John Trump for high crimes and misdemeanors. The House charged Trump with “incitement of insurrection” on January 6th and included language declaring Trump unfit to run for public office in the future. This marked the first time in American history a president has been impeached twice by the House.

On January 25th, the House delivered the article of impeachment against former President Donald Trump to the Senate. The impeachment trial will begin in the…


Image for post
Image for post
(Photo by Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images)

Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial begins on February 9th. It is unknown how long the trial will take, but both parties are on the same page in their desire for a speedy trial. While the House impeachment managers say they have an open and shut case, Trump’s legal team is saying not so fast.

Here are three things to watch for:

  1. The Guest List. For the first time, the chief justice will not preside over a presidential impeachment trial because Trump is no longer in office. Overseeing the trial will be president pro tempore of the Senate Patrick Leahy, D-Vt…

Image for post
Image for post
Seth Abramson via Substack

Freshman Congresswoman from Georgia, Marjorie Taylor Greene, has been getting a lot of attention because of her extreme conspiratorial beliefs and radical, offensive statements. But she isn’t the first in the Republican party nor is she the only.

Long ago, the Republican party built a home for conspiracies by tolerating the once “fringe” members of their caucus, such as Gohmert, Biggs, Nunes, Gaetz, and Gosar. But those fringes are now among the most powerful in the caucus, and their ranks are only growing.

Conspiracy theorists are not new to American politics. In the 1950s and 60s, Joseph McCarthy and the…


Image for post
Image for post
Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Getty Images photo: Win McNamee

One week into Biden’s presidency and he has wasted no time in getting to work on a myriad of issues, most notably climate change. After watching his predecessor roll back Obama-era climate change policies, including America’s 2020 exit from the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. Biden signed an executive order on January 20, 2021 re-entering America into the Paris Climate Agreement. The Paris Agreement was “a historic commitment, among nearly 200 nations, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to stave off the worst effects of climate change.”

Aside from rejoining the Paris Climate Agreement, Biden’s crusade to combat climate change has included…


Image for post
Image for post
Photo: Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

One of the biggest takeaways from the insurrection and domestic terrorist attack at the U.S. Capitol this week was, words matter.

When the president, and his fellow party members, elected or appointed, use their platform to incite violence, stoke fears, and peddle disinformation to their supporters, they should be held accountable.

In a time when our country is so ardently divided, care must be taken with the words our leaders use and the rhetoric they spew on social media, in the news, or other public forums. …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

On Wednesday, America ushered in a new chapter in American history with the swearing in of Joe Biden, the 46th President of the United States of America, and glass ceilings were shattered when Kamala Harris made history as the first woman, first Black person and first person of South Asian descent to become vice president. Wednesday’s inauguration took place at a Capitol two weeks earlier under siege by domestic terrorists and a heavy military presence along. Social distancing, masks, and limited attendance served as a reminder of the times, but it did not overshadow the moment.

The 59th presidential inauguration…

Mary Anna Mancuso

Florida-based #PoliticalAnalyst | Seen weekly on WPTV ‘s #ToThePoint | #CountryOverParty

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store